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Tim Curry
Tim Curry in MOMI 2010
Full name: Timothy James Curry
Birth date: April 19, 1946
Birth place: Grappenhall, Cheshire, England
Occupation: Actor
Singer
Musician
Voice actor
Education: Kingswood High School
Birmingham University
Religion: Agnostic
Parents: James Curry (deceased)
Patricia Curry (deceased)


Timothy James "Tim" Curry[1] (born April 19, 1946)[1] is an English actor, singer and a voice actor for Regular Show.[2] On Regular Show, he first provided the voice of the leader of the hot dogs in the episode "Meat Your Maker," and also voiced The Master Prank Caller while the character was off-screen (as Sam Marin provided the character's voice when on-screen) in the episode "Prank Callers."

Early life

Timothy James Curry was born on April 19, 1946 in Grappenhall, Cheshire, England to his parents Patricia, a secretary, and James, a Royal Navy chaplain who was also a Methodist.[1][3][4] He spent his early childhood at naval bases in a variety of locations, including Hong Kong.[5] Curry was a male soprano at the age of six and started acting in school plays.[2] His father died in 1958 from pneumonia, when Curry was a pre-teen.[4] He attended boarding school at Kingswood High School, which he left in 1964 and traveled to Morocco, France and Belgium, working on boats.[6] and attended college at Birmingham University beginning in 1965, where he studied Drama and English and eventually graduated with combined honors in 1968.[4][5][7]

Career

Broadway

Following college Curry started his acting career on Broadway, playing a part in Hair, where he won the role and earned his Equity card; he remained in Hair from 1968 through 1970.[5] After leaving the company that made Hair in 1970, he acted for the Glasgow Citizens Theatre and The Royal Court Theatre in London.[5] He then portrayed Frank 'N' Furter in the musical-comedy The Rocky Horror Picture Show, a role which he played for four weeks and became his breakout role.[2][8] He would be nominated for a Drama Desk Award for Outstanding Actor in a Musical for his work on Rocky Horror in 1975, but did not win the award.[8] The play closed after only a month due to poor reviews and ticket sales.[5] He made his film debut in the film rendition of Rocky Horror, reprising his role as Frank 'N' Furter; the film, however, was a box-office failure.[5] He then played Tristan Tzara in the Travesties, a role in which he had to dress in drag to play.[8] He played this role for nearly five months before taking a break from Broadway to embark on a music career.[2][8] Curry later acted on British television series such as the historical figure William Shakespeare in the mini-series Life of Shakespeare in 1978.[5]

Music

He then released his debut album in 1978, Read My Lips, the album's main theme being rock.[2] He also sang backup on Carly Simon's album Spy in 1979.[9] He then took a break from all acting media to go on tour and work on his second album, Fearless, co-writing most of the songs on the album.[2] Fearless proved more successful than Read My Lips, making it to the top 75 on Billboard's top 200 album charts.[2] Curry's single I Do the Rock charted at 91 on the American Billboard Hot 100, as did another single of his, Paradise Garage.[2] Curry's final album with new material, Simplicity, was released through A&M Records in 1981.[2] Finally, The Best of Tim Curry was released in 1989, containing Curry's greatest songs.[2]

Film and television

After leaving the music world he returned to his roots, acting on Broadway once more, portraying the Pirate King in The Pirates of Penzance, which earned him a Stage Actor of the Year award from The Royal Variety Club,[5] historical composer Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart in Amadeus, a drama, where he played the role for nearly three years. For his work on Amadeus, he was nominated for two awards: a Drama Desk Award for Outstanding Actor in a Play and a Tony Award for Best Actor in a Play, both in 1981. Nonetheless, he failed to win both awards.[8] Curry once more took time off from Broadway to start acting in films, playing Darkness in Legend and the house butler Wadsworth in Clue. He then made his television debut playing Winston Newquay on the CBS series Wiseguys and also acted in the television movie The Worst Witch as The Grand Wizard.[2][5] He continued acting on television as Pennywise the Clown in the miniseries Stephen King's It and also returned to Broadway with the musical My Favorite Year to play Alan Swann for a month.[2][8] He was nominated for a Tony Award for Best Actor in a Musical in 1993, but did not win the award.[8] He then played Dr. Thornton Poole in the film Oscar in 1991, which remains one of his favorite roles.[5] He then played Mr. Hector in Home Alone 2: Lost in New York.[5]

Voiceovers and return to Broadway

Curry then began doing voiceover work, beginning with providing the voice of a serpent in the cartoon version of Creation and voiced Hexus in the film FernGully: The Last Rainforest.[5][10] He voiced King Chicken and multiple other villains on Duckman and voiced Captain Hook on Peter Pan and the Pirates, which earned him an Emmy Award in 1991.[2][11] He also replaced David Rappaport as the computer MAL in Captain Planet and the Planeteers after Rappaport's death.[2] He then provided the voice of Nigel Thornberry on The Wild Thornberrys, as well as playing Lord Dragaunus in The Mighty Ducks, G. Gorden Godfrey in Young Justice, Professor Finbar Calamitous on The Adventires of Jimmy Neutron: Boy Genius, Taurus Bulba on Darkwing Duck and Evil Manta on The Little Mermaid.[2] He was nominated or an Annie Award in 1998 in the category of "Outstanding Individual Achievement for Voice Acting by a Male Performer in an Animated Feature Production" for his role as Forte in Beauty and the Beast: The Enchanted Christmas.[11] Curry has stated he enjoys voice acting as it helps improve his accents, saying: "One of the reasons I started doing cartoons, is I really wanted to play American characters, and they let me play American characters in cartoons. So it's been a way for me to work on my American accents."[12] He also acted in Muppet Treasure Island and Roseanne.[2]

While voice acting, he also produced the short-lived ABC sitcom Over the Top, which he also acted in.[13] He later guest starred on Will & Grace.[5] Curry also continued acting in films, playing Gomez Addams in a film reunion of The Addams Family and Rodger Corwin in a film adaption of Charlie's Angels.[5] He once again returned to Broadway, playing King Arthur in the musical-comedy Spamalot, playing the role for nearly four years.[8] By the time the play closed on January 11, 2009, he made over 175 million dollars and was nominated for a Tony Award for Best Actor in a Musical in 2005, but yet again failed to win the award.[2][8] More recently, he acted in Eric Idle's play What About Dick? in April 2012 alongside Eddie Izzard, Tracey Ullman, Billy Connolly and Russell Brand.[2]

Voice credits

This section may be incomplete

Season 1

Personal life

He also had an older sister, named Judith, nicknamed Judy, who was born in Egypt and she held dual English and Egyptian citizenship.[4] Judy later died of a brain tumor in 2001.[6][14] His mother died in June 1999 after battling cancer for two years.[6] Despite having been taught at a religious school, Curry considers himself an agnostic.[4][5] In July 2012, Curry suffered a stroke and is going through physical therapy and is reported to be recovering from the stroke.[15] He considers Gandhi, Alec Guinness, Rex Harrison and Picasso his idols.[16] He resides in Los Angeles, California with his dog Frank, where he tends to his garden, cooks and also reads and paints.[2][5][14][16]

External links

References

  1. 1.0 1.1 1.2 http://www.biography.com/people/tim-curry-21243681
  2. 2.00 2.01 2.02 2.03 2.04 2.05 2.06 2.07 2.08 2.09 2.10 2.11 2.12 2.13 2.14 2.15 2.16 2.17 2.18 http://www.denofgeek.us/movies/55873/tim-curry-a-career-retrospective
  3. http://www.filmreference.com/film/35/Tim-Curry.html
  4. 4.0 4.1 4.2 4.3 4.4 http://www.nndb.com/people/763/000023694/
  5. 5.00 5.01 5.02 5.03 5.04 5.05 5.06 5.07 5.08 5.09 5.10 5.11 5.12 5.13 5.14 5.15 http://www.timcurry.co.uk/#/biography/4546489136
  6. 6.0 6.1 6.2 http://www.timcurry.co.uk/#/faq/4546518280
  7. http://www.tv.com/people/tim-curry/biography/
  8. 8.0 8.1 8.2 8.3 8.4 8.5 8.6 8.7 8.8 http://ibdb.com/person.php?id=36907
  9. http://www.tvguide.com/celebrities/tim-curry/bio/284379
  10. http://news.google.com/newspapers?nid=1320&dat=19931117&id=_3w1AAAAIBAJ&sjid=XOoDAAAAIBAJ&pg=1186,4842299
  11. 11.0 11.1 http://voicechasers.com/database/showactor.php?actorid=1259&tab=awards
  12. http://news.google.com/newspapers?nid=348&dat=19921218&id=O-0uAAAAIBAJ&sjid=9zIDAAAAIBAJ&pg=5111,5747225
  13. http://news.google.com/newspapers?nid=1291&dat=19971019&id=9z9UAAAAIBAJ&sjid=OY4DAAAAIBAJ&pg=4177,1267807
  14. 14.0 14.1 http://www.standard.co.uk/goingout/theatre/tim-currys-back-on-the-grail-trail-7174713.html
  15. http://hollywoodlife.com/2013/05/25/tim-curry-july-stroke-rocky-horror-picture-show/
  16. 16.0 16.1 http://news.google.com/newspapers?nid=398&dat=19971203&id=cX8xAAAAIBAJ&sjid=TT8DAAAAIBAJ&pg=6189,7903832

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